The Art of Disagreeing

We’re smack bang in the middle of Holiday Season. Which means we’re going to be interacting with a lot of family and friends… and we don’t agree with some of them on a few things. Thing is, how do we avoid the awkward spiral of…
“I’m right!”
“No! I’m right!”
“I Hate you!”
“We only invited you ‘cos Mom said so. Everybody hates you. Even the dog.”
*bangs mug on table*

Cue awkward family reactions, some picking sides, some apathetic. Holiday Ruined.

So, since this is my blog, I’m going to write up how I kind of deal with these situations and a lot of it is mindset.

1. Don’t be an asshole – By this I mean, stick to the argument. No ad hominem attacks, even if they are really ugly and stupid, don’t do it. Be focused on what you’re trying to get across or understand.

2. Know Your Logical Fallacies – related to ad hominem attacks above… brush up on all the Logical Fallacies. Train yourself to get your thinking right (never a wasted pursuit).

3. Focus on understanding rather than being right – You’re a human being. You’re occasionally wrong. So, in an argument, the best way to always proceed is to get the person you’re arguing with to explain their position and you focus on listening and trying to understand their perspective.  This also means you have to get used to admitting you’re wrong if you do have the wrong end of the stick.

4. Pay attention to who you’re arguing with – Please don’t try and persuade someone the of some strongly held opinion of yours in an area where they have expertise e.g. arguing about chemotherapy with an oncologist. Recognise when you’re out of your depth and don’t argue at all. Smile and nod.

That’s it. The above guides me when I’m confronted in any way or form with this type of situation.

I hope it’s helpful.

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What Makes a Great Pizza?

It’s subjective, but there’s definitely a few elements which, if you get them right, makes it all come together.

So let’s start… (This is describing a Margherita… naturally)

  1. The Base – It MUST be thin… and crispy.
  2. Sauce – The tomato sauce needs to be high quality, tasty. Which means it stays away from being sour or too sharp.  Secret ingredient here is a little bit of brown sugar (kinda the same as pasta sauce), adding basil also adds a great dimension to the taste.
  3. The Cheese. – A nice melty cheese is key here, and nothing with too strong a taste on its own.  Gouda, Cheddar, Mozzarella are good options. Better if all three together.
  4. Garnish with other mixed herbs.

That’s what makes a great pizza. To me anyway, as I said… it’s subjective.

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Fiction and Non-Fiction: The How and What of Consuming Literature


Have you ever noticed the way you actually “read” books? A thought struck me the other day about the actual act of “reading”. I, for example, read off a kindle, consume audiobooks and now and again pick up an actual paperback.

Given these three different reading mediums (granted listening to an audiobook isn’t exactly reading), I’ve noticed that there is some interaction with the way we prefer to learn.

I can only read fiction while I prefer to listen to non-fiction in audiobook format. Non-fiction just can’t seem to keep my attention long enough on a page, my mind kind of gets heavy with the reading and I struggle to focus while listening to it passively, provides no problem. Fiction, however, I can consume in both formats equally. It’s most probably the entertainment factor, but it’s also the writing. A book of any kind, badly written, would irritate me to no end.

There are exceptions, ofcourse. I was able to read Malcolm Gladwell’s books pretty easily which makes me think the hypothesis of reading fiction alone merely because of it’s entertainment value doesn’t holdany water. It’s the writer and the writing that’s important, along with the ideas and the way they’re conveyed. Above all it has to be relevant.

I’ve noticed that with a lot of non-fiction books, there is a LOT of filler. Either saying the same thing over and over in different words or taking a long time to get to the point. I honestly believe that most non-fiction books can be easily cut down to 15 minute reads covering the main ideas. Apps like Blinkist prove my point easily, but even Blinkist has a lot of extra in it which doesn’t need to be there.

There’s a definite gap in the market for consuming these books and merely getting the main ideas out.  If any explanation is needed, analogies work the best to make people grasp foreign concepts.  There’s a real nugget here.

Anyway… wherever it ends up… keep reading.

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How Many Times Am I Going To Start This Damn Blog?


I’ve started and re-started this blog about 4 or 5 times over the last 10 years. Lost all the previous content. But that’s life. I have to begin again. So here it is.

Let’s hope I can actually start writing consistently again. I need a routine for this writing thing otherwise it’s just not going to work. Another dead end blog in the sea of dead end blogs.

I need to get my shit in order.

Peace.

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